You are here

MHA's Blog: Chiming In

Older Posts

Posted: May 9, 2014

Patrick Hendry, Senior Director for Consumer Advocacy at Mental Health America, was presented the National Council for Behavioral Health’s Reintegration Lifetime Achievement award at its Annual Conference this past week. The award, which is supported by Eli Lilly and Company, recognizes a mental health leader and champion who has devoted his/her life to helping persons with mental illness recover; achieve their goals; and live full, productive lives in the community. Hendry is generously...

Tags:
Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: February 26, 2014

Electronic Health Records Pose Challenge to Mental and Behavioral Health Care By Patrick Hendry, Mental Health America Senior Director of Consumer Advocacy [This post originally appeared on StarLifeBrands.com] An electronic health record (EHR) replaces the traditional paper charts and records that have restricted access and sharing for many years. It is a digital record, created in real time, and instantly and securely available to authorized users. They are patient-centered records and...

Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: January 10, 2014

Lars and The Real Girl is a sweet movie that shows the power of true community integration. It’s the story of a young man who needs help and finds it with his family, friends, co-workers and church. It’s the kind of story that needs to be told more often in the face of the cynical stories told today. Lars and the Real Girl was made in 2007 and stars a pre-stardom Ryan Gosling as Lars. He’s a withdrawn, awkward but sweet young man who lives in the separated garage of his brother and pregnant...

Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: January 2, 2014

William Shakespeare wrote Hamlet around 1600, telling the story of a prince dealing with the death of his father and the quick remarriage of his mother to his uncle. The play uses mental health, both real and faked, as a way to show human behavior. Commonly studied in high schools all over America, this tale has had a profound effect on the way mental health is viewed. The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark tells the story of Hamlet, the young prince. When the play opens, his father has just...

Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: December 19, 2013

Psychopathy is a loaded term in today’s society, often misused and misunderstood. With all of the recent gun violence, the term is often used to describe the shooter. But its true meaning, and its true effect on a person, their family and their community is often obscured. We Need to Talk About Kevin, the 2011 Lynne Ramsey movie, tries to deal with this issue on a personal level. We Need To Talk About Kevin was based on a book by Lionel Shriver, and follows Eva Katchadourian, played by Tilda...

Tags:
No Tags
Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: December 12, 2013

Jacob’s Ladder is one of the most psychological movies I’ve watched for this blog, touching on a number of issues that have come up over and over again. It’s also one of the scariest and most genuinely upsetting movies I’ve watched in a long time. Made in 1990, Jacob’s Ladder is about a man named Jacob Singer, played by Tim Robbins. The movie opens with his unit being attacked in Vietnam, with many of fellow soldiers experiencing odd symptoms. The scene then switches to Jacob waking up on...

Tags:
No Tags
Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: December 5, 2013

The 1948 movie The Snake Pit casts a long shadow in the mental health profession. It’s generally considered one of the worst movies about people with mental health conditions ever made. But how bad is it really? Could it be as terrible as its reputation makes it seem? The answer is yes, sort of. The Snake Pit stars Olivia de Havilland as Virginia Cunningham, a housewife in New York. When we first meet her, she’s delusional, believing that a woman in the park used to be a man, and she doesn’t...

Tags:
No Tags
Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: November 14, 2013

Mental health conditions are as old as human beings, maybe older. As a result, humans have been talking, singing and writing about mental health for as long as we’ve existed.  Stories like Nikolai Gogol’s “Diary of a Madman” are a good reminder that people have been talking about mental health for a long time, if not from their personal experience. Written in 1835, “Diary of Madman” tells the story of Poprishchin, a minor bureaucrat. In love with his boss’ daughter, he is first gripped by...

Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: November 12, 2013

November 26 Forum in Newark on Transferring Lessons Learned in the Public Behavioral Health System to the Expanded Options under the ACA Mental Health America’s Regional Policy Council will host an issue forum in Newark on Tuesday, November 26, on Transferring Lessons Learned in the Public Behavioral Health System to the Expanded Options under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The briefing will be held at the Hilton Newark Penn Station, 1048 Raymond Blvd., from 10:00 am to 12 Noon. The...

Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: November 7, 2013

The Bell Jar, a 1963 novel by Sylvia Plath, is best known for being a semi-autobiographical work about the troubled life of the author. While it is definitely that, it’s also an interesting look at a peer support relationship, even if it never gets that title. The Bell Jar follows the life of a young woman named Esther Greenwood. Esther is a clinical depressed young woman, unhappy with the choice in life to be a wife and mother or in a traditional female profession. She gets an endowment...

Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: October 31, 2013

Happy Halloween, readers! Today’s topic is Edgar Allan Poe, the famous writer of dark tales and stories. With his own lived experiences with addiction, and his interest in science, psychology is all over his work in very exciting ways. Edgar Allan Poe was an author and literary critic in the early 1800s. His parents died when he was young, and he was adopted by the Allan family in Richmond. He dropped out of the University of Virginia due to gambling debts, enrolled in the army and went to...

Tags:
No Tags
Comments: 0 Comments
Posted: October 24, 2013

Movies have a set language they use to discuss issues. Short of a few outliers here or there, movies about mental health conditions use the same visual language to explain mental health to the audience. They use similar shortcuts to describe everything else. It took a master filmmaker like Alfred Hitchcock to subvert them so completely, and inPsycho, he fundamentally changed the way shortcuts about mental health in movies were depicted. Psycho is a 1960’s movie based on a novel by Robert...

Comments: 0 Comments

2000 N. Beauregard Street,
6th Floor Alexandria, VA 22311

Phone (703) 684.7722

Toll Free (800) 969.6642

Fax (703) 684.5968

Text Resize

-A +A

The links on this page may contain document data that requires additional software to open: